As the “media blitz” involving radio and other appearances in support of my new book, Magic, Mysticism and the Molecule continues, I thought I would make available here for readers of the Gralien Report an excerpt from the book’s second chapter.

The following snippet from my book details my introduction to Dr. Raymond Moody, whose unique variety of grief counseling involves the use of an ancient magical tool called the “psychomanteum.” My own experiences with this ancient practice, as well as those close to me at the time, began to get increasingly strange and unsettling as we proceeded with using it to unravel bizarre mysteries of the mind. You’ll get an idea of what I’m referring to in the excerpt below. Enjoy!

LABYRINTHS OF THE MIND: THE ANCIENT GREEK

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Micah Hanks

Author: Micah Hanks

Micah Hanks is a writer, researcher, and podcaster. His interests include areas of history, science, archaeology, philosophy, and the study of anomalous phenomena in nature. He can be reached at info@micahhanks.com.

6 Replies to “Labyrinths of the Mind: An excerpt from “Magic, Mysticism & the Molecule”

  1. As to your experience with the mirror becoming lighter or darker as you stared at it, I would be interested in knowing whether or not it can be replicated by staring at an arbitrary object. I have done this, and had a similar effect to what you describe, which I have variously attributed to my eye’s adjustment to the light, jamais vu, and a low-scale gantzfield effect.

    The book seems worth buying. I expect to get it at some point.

  2. ENKI,

    Funny you mention the Ganzfeld effect; I discuss that in the chapter that follows the one excerpted above! In fact, I have experienced far more interesting effects using this than the psychomanteum itself, although many swear by using mirrors to evoke altered states.

    Regardless, they both seem to do the same thing, essentially: shift the mind into a different brain-state (like the Theta state, for instance) under which the individual becomes a bit more receptive to “psychic” phenomenon. As to what the nature (or source) of the aforementioned “phenomenon” may be, the verdict is still out…

  3. A thousand apologies for being so late in my reading this excerpt of your book! Anyway, this small text has already sparked many questions in my head:

    * What does Moody and you) think of implementing the psychomanteum sessions inside or near a sismologically charged area? somewhere like the subterranean caves filled with teluric energy that were commonly used in ancient times to commune with the spirit world? Do you think that would help to amplify the effect of the psychomanteum?

    * Does any type of mirror work? I ask because reading the passage made me think of Guillermo del Toro’s novel ‘The Strain’. In it, one of the characters (and old vampire hunter) explains that for detecting vampires, there’s nothing better than old mirrors made of silver; he claimed that the new mirrors made of chromium were not as good. And yes, I’m aware this is a work of fiction, but still… 😉

    *What does Moody (and you) say about the effect of electromagnetic fields emmanated from modern electrical appliances affecting the psychomanteum?

    * And finally, have you had the chance to read the essay ‘Reflections at Tinkinswood’ by John Higgs (included in Darklore 4)? In it, he offers the hypothesis that Neolithic rock art in England and other European sites might have been meant to serve as a place to observe the ripples and reflections produced by rippling water. Anyway, maybe those places are the very first examples of Moody’s psychomanteum!

    Saludos,

    RPJ

  4. Hey RPJ,

    Excellent questions, and sorry for the belated reply! I’ll excerpt each of the questions below, with the appropriate responses attributed to each.

    1) What does Moody and you) think of implementing the psychomanteum sessions inside or near a sismologically charged area? somewhere like the subterranean caves filled with teluric energy that were commonly used in ancient times to commune with the spirit world? Do you think that would help to amplify the effect of the psychomanteum?

    A) I’m not certain what Moody’s take on this would be, but instantly I’m reminded of seismic release of geomagnetic energy, which might have a similar effect on the human physiology. This, in essence, is something very similar to an experiment Joshua and I have proposed for further study in our LEMUR lab, in which we would produce intense static electric fields within a psychomanteum chamber. To do this, we would likely use a combination of a high-output Tesla coil we have designed, linked to a laboratory-grade coil antennae that would “broadcast” RFs into the environment, as well as a Van de Graff electrostatic generator that produces a static charge. In previous experiments, placing one in close proximity to such a setup has resulted in minor headaches, as well as a “giddy”, almost euphoric sensation. plus, the Tesla coil produces a good amount of noise (similar to “white noise” static between radio stations) which might be useful in helping tune-out audible distractions.

    2) Does any type of mirror work? I ask because reading the passage made me think of Guillermo del Toro

  5. In terms of the types of mirrors working — historically, scrying mirrors have not been mirrors necessarily. John Dee’s scrying mirror (I saw it when it was on display locally) is matte black, and from what I understand, that’s not atypical of scrying devices.

    Micah, although I may be stating the obvious, there are some things that perhaps your experiments with enhancing the psychomanteum experience might benefit from:

    1) Binaural entrainment could be built into the room or the noise generators. More effective than theta waves is actually hypnagogia — generate this by switching between entraining theta and alpha waves.

    2) It might be useful to prime things subliminally and determine whether or not the primed information comes through in the psychomanteum experience (or otherwise affects the experience).

    Also, as for the EMF ‘noise’ — how close is it to microwave range, when it generates altered states resulting in apparent hallucinations? One of the various explanations for microwave audio induction (that amusing government-researched effect that tinfoil hats are intended to counter) is that waves in this range activate neurons, and if that is the case, noise in this range might activate this state just as effectively as listening to white noise and watching television static.

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